Franklin-Washington - Taming the Beast Part 6: 2c Type Identifiers

edited October 12 in Stamp Reviews 3 LikesVote Down
Continuing on from the 3c identifiers, we enter into the last leg of the FW identifier for regular issues. Once you get this down, you can pretty much identify any of the regular varieties of any FW. Couple it with our FW Matrix, and this makes IDing your FW take seconds instead of minutes (or hours/days/years :) ).

There are 9 variations of the Washington 2c in a "Red" color (Carmine, Lake, Rose Red), designated Type I to Type VII. The other two then are Type Ia and Type Va, bringing the total to 9.

Like the 3c identifiers, Scott mentions many subtle variations in types, but for some there is a single unique identifier. Once you get these down, you will find IDing most of these with a quick peek under magnification is easy. I'll summarize these at the end of this list.

Type I
Left Ribbon - One shading line
Right Ribbon - One shading line
Button - Faint outline
Button Inner Lines - Faint lines
Toga Rope - Top line of the toga rope from button to throat very faint.
Face - The shading lines of the face terminate in front of the ear with little or no joining, to form a lock of hair.
Press Types: Flat, Rotary
Key Identifier: Button and Toga Rope - All lines and outline are faint.

Type I - Both Ribbons
Left and right Ribbon folds - 1 shading line


Type I - Button and Rope Large
Button and Rope - Faint lines, thin and complete.

Type Ia
Left Ribbon - One shading line
Right Ribbon - One shading line
Button - Very Heavy
Button Inner Lines - Very Heavy
Toga Rope - Stronger than Type I
Face - The shading lines of the face at the lock of hair end in a strong vertical curved line.
Press Types: Flat
Key Identifier: Button and Toga Rope - All lines are very heavy. The entire stamp is visibly heavier in all lines.

Type 1a - Button and Toga
Button and Rope - all lines very heavy.


Type 1a - Hair Line
Lines at base of hair - this is mentioned in Scott, but is not really a great identifying mark.


NOTE: There is a separate article on this site that goes into specific detail regarding the difference between Type I and Type Ia. If you're really in need of IDing this type it is recommended to review that article as well).

Type II
Left Ribbon - One shading line
Right Ribbon - One shading line
Button - Heavy
Button Inner Lines - Heavy
Toga Rope - Lines on top of the rope and button are complete but not as heavy as Type Ia, heavier than Type I.
Face - The shading lines of the face at the lock of hair end in a strong vertical curved line.
Press Types: Rotary
Key Identifier: Toga Rope and Button - Top of toga rope line is heave, button outline is heavy. Occurs ONLY on Rotary Press issues.


Type I v Type II - Rope and Button Small
The image at left is Type II, while the image at right is Type I. This is one of the most subtle differences of any type, but remember, it ONLY occurs on Rotary press. It otherwise has all the same characteristic of a Type I.

Type III
Left Ribbon - Two shading lines
Right Ribbon - Two shading lines
Button - Heavy
Button Inner Lines - Heavy
Face - The shading lines of the face at the lock of hair end in a strong vertical curved line.
Press Types: Rotary
Key Identifier: Two shading lines in the ribbon at left and right. Occurs ONLY on Rotary Press issues.


Type III - Both Ribbons
The outer left edge of left ribbon has 2 shading lines, the inner left fold of the right ribbon has 2 shading lines. This type occurs ONLY on Rotary Press.

Type IV
Left Ribbon - One shading line
Right Ribbon - One shading line
Button Inner Lines - "DID" in Button
Toga Rope - Top line of toga rope is broken.
Left 2 - Line of color thin, and usually broken.
Press Types: Offset
Key Identifier: "DID" (where left D is reversed) in button lines. Occurs ONLY on Offset Press.


Type IV - Large
The lines inside the button appear to form DID (with left "D" reversed). The toga rope is broken between several lines (appears more complete on some impressions than others). But the presence of the DID makes this issue extremely easy to identify. Other characteristics like the left 2 are really not needed to ID the Type IV.

Type V
Left Ribbon - One shading line
Right Ribbon - One shading line
Button Inner Lines - 5 lines in button
Toga Rope - Top line of toga rope is complete.
Face - The shading dots of the nose are complete.
Left 2 - In the scroll base of the 2, the scroll is well defined, and color crisp.
Press Types: Offset
Key Identifier: Base of the 2 at left scroll is well defined. Occurs ONLY on Offset Press.

Type V - Large
Note the base of the 2 at left. Where the bottom left edge of the two curves back on itself, the scroll is very clear. This must be compared in other types, and the Type V is one of the more difficult to differentiate, so use caution.

Type Va
Left Ribbon - One shading line
Right Ribbon - One shading line
Button Inner Lines - 5 lines in button
Toga Rope - Top line of toga rope is complete.
Face - The third row of dots from the bottom has four dots instead of six. Overall height is 1/3mm shorter.
Left 2 - Line of color thin, and usually broken.
Press Types: Offset
Key Identifier: Third row of dots from the bottom of the nose has only 4 dots instead of 6. Occurs ONLY on Offset Press.

Type Va - Large
Note the missing dots in the nose. This makes this issue very easy to identify. I have seen one example of this that has a very tiny dot in the 5th position, but 6th dot is entirely missing. In this case, it is still a Va, and the dot is considered a rogue inking. It's much smaller than the other dots.


Type VI
Left Ribbon - One shading line
Right Ribbon - One shading line
Button Inner Lines - 5 lines in button
Toga Rope - Top line of toga rope is complete.
Face - Shading dots of the nose are complete.
Left 2 - Line of color is heavy.
Press Types: Offset
Key Identifier: Heavy line of color in the left 2. Occurs ONLY on Offset Press.

Type VI - Large
Note that the central line that makes up the back edge of the two is very heavy and distinct. In other types, this line appears thin to broken. This is the key distinguishing factor between the Type V and Type VI, so use caution.

Type VII
Left Ribbon - One shading line
Right Ribbon - One shading line
Face - Additional row of dots added to the upper lip. Dots in hair on head are numerous.
Left 2 - Continuous and clear, but not as heavy as VI.
Press Types: Offset
Key Identifier: Additional row of dots added to the upper lip. Occurs ONLY on Offset Press.

Type VII - Large
There are 3 distinctive rows of vertical dots in the upper lip.

Comments

  • 1 Comment sorted by Votes Date Added
  • I've run out of room in the previous post, so I'll continue it here. We did cover the 9 types, so just some things to summarize and help with quick ID's.

    Just to finalized on the Type VII, this is a very tough issue. Of the Offset press types, the VII shares many characteristics with the other offset types, and it's Left 2 can be deceptive. Using the 3 rows of vertical dots in the upper lip check gets tricky too, because on some issues of the 528B, these are a little muddy, and on other offset issues a "rogue dot" may appear at left or right of the others, giving the impression of 3 vertical rows, but usually this is just 1 or 2 rogue dots. There is often a "gap" toward the front of the upper lip, and a light dot may appear here. So use caution with Type V, VI and VII. Va is one of my favorites, as it easily removes all other types with it's missing dots.

    (I originally had started the article above with the following statement, but decided to move it here so that I could get all 9 types listed in a single post):

    Another issue that often trips up early ID attempts is the mixing of designs. There are two types of Washington 2c. They are designated in Scott by Design Type A139 and A140. The A139 type has the words "TWO CENTS" written across the bottom, where the A140 is "2 Cents 2" across the bottom. These type indenters apply ONLY to the A140 design type. There are no variations in design types in the "TWO CENTS" varieties, so no need to go looking for variations to differentiate these.

    So let's wrap up the "Easy to ID"
    Type III - The only issue with 2 lines in the left and right ribbon folds.
    Type IV - DID in the central button
    Type Va - 4 dots in the nose instead of 6.
    Type VII - 3 distinctive rows of dots in upper lip on Rotary Press types (Sometimes clear)

    The others, we need to combine 2 things to make sure we've got an ID:
    Type I - Faint outer lines of the toga rope and toga button on Flat or Rotary presses.
    Type Ia - Extremely bold color in all lines of the stamp, and a very heavy toga rope (all lines) and button (outer lines).
    Type II - Top line of the toga rope is heavy and complete (but not as heavy as Type Ia), and ONLY on Rotary Press.
    Type V - Shading in the dots of the nose are complete AND In the scroll base of the 2, the scroll is well defined, the line between the two will be fainter than that of Type VI.
    Type VI - Line of color that makes up the central curve of the 2 is very heavy.
    Type VII - Where the 3 lines in the upper lip may not be so definitive, then compare the left 2. The line of color that makes up the inner curve is distinctive and clear, but not as heavy as type VI.

    Type I - Appears on Flat or Rotary Press.
    Type Ia - Appears ONLY on Flat Plate Press.
    Type II - III - Appears ONLY on Rotary Press.
    Types IV - VII appear ONLY on Offset Press.

    And as always, if you'd like a copy of our FW ID Matrix, please email me and request a copy at scottvpayton@hotmail.com

    If you have any questions on this or any FW identification, please feel free to ask!
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